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Fostering Creativity & Learning: How to Implement a Board Game Project

Updated: Feb 15


Engage students by getting them to create board games!

In an era when digital screens seem to dominate, the tactile, interactive experience of playing a board game remains a delight. But what if students were given the opportunity not just to play, but to create their own board games? A 'Creating Board Games' unit can be a powerful way to engage students, stimulate creativity, and apply learning in any subject.

In my classroom...

In our probability unit, I introduced a project where students were tasked with creating their own board games, focusing on integrating probability concepts. This hands-on approach aimed to deepen their understanding of probability in a fun, engaging way. Students worked in groups, brainstorming game ideas that incorporated probability through dice rolls, card draws, or spinners.


They designed game rules, objectives, and mechanics that required players to make decisions based on probabilistic outcomes. As they tested and refined their games, I observed remarkable engagement and a deeper grasp of probability concepts. The culmination was a class showcase where each group presented their game, explaining the probability principles behind it. This project not only enhanced their learning but also fostered creativity, collaboration, and critical thinking.


Here's a guide on how you can run this dynamic and engaging activity in your classroom.


Research and Development

Before diving into the creation process, it's essential to build a solid foundation of understanding. Provide students with the space to research and analyze what makes a board game enjoyable and effective. Encourage them to tap into their experiences and expertise as board game players. Some key topics to consider:

Create a Board Game templates and resources. A learning resource from Sherbert Learning. Engage your students in their learning through board games!
  • The history and development of games.

  • What makes a board game enjoyable (compare and contrast different games).

  • Features of board games.

  • Thinking critically about board game rules and instructions.


Creation

An example of a student board game. Teacher used the Sherbert Learning: Create a Board Game to engage students in their learning

Once students have a solid understanding of what goes into a good board game, they can start the creation process. Encourage them to bring their ideas to life, designing all the elements needed for their game, including dice, spinners, question cards, and the game board. Allow them to be creative, and ensure they know that the sky is the limit!


Application and Review

Create a Board Game templates and resources. A learning resource from Sherbert Learning. Engage your students in their learning through board games!

After the creation process, the real fun begins: playing the games! Students should first play their own games to test out the mechanics and instructions, and to determine if they're fun. Then, they should play each other's games, offering constructive feedback for improvements. This phase allows for genuine reflection and presents an opportunity to make adjustments based on user experience.


Implementation Tips:

An example of a student board game. Teacher used the Sherbert Learning: Create a Board Game to engage students in their learning
  • Clearly outline the project's objectives and expectations from the start.

  • Encourage students to reflect their learning and understanding from the unit in the game.

  • Allow sufficient time for the creation process - it's not a race.

  • Foster a positive, constructive environment for feedback and game review.

  • Celebrate all finished games – a game expo could be a fun way to wrap up the project!


Examples of Units of Work:

  1. History: Students could create games based on historical events or periods they've studied.

  2. Science: Games could revolve around concepts such as the life cycle, the solar system, or the process of photosynthesis.

  3. Math: Games could help players practice or apply mathematical concepts, such as fractions or geometry.

  4. Geography: Games could help players learn about different countries, landforms, or climate zones.

  5. Literature: Students could create games based on abook they've read in class, allowing for deeper exploration of themes, characters, and plot.


In conclusion, a unit on creating board games provides a platform for students to apply their learning in a fun, engaging way. If you're looking for a comprehensive resource to support this endeavor, consider the "Create a Board Game: Project-Based Learning Unit." This resource includes everything you'll need to run a successful, engaging, and educational board game creation unit. Don't wait – bring the joy of learning to your classroom with this unique project today! Find it here!


Create a Board Game cover. A learning resource from Sherbert Learning. Engage your students in their learning through board games!

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